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Young Building

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1929, Herbert Cohen Cayton. Kamehameha Ave. and Haili St.

With its corner entrance and a vaguely Art Deco parapet, this two-story, stuccoed, reinforced-concrete building dominates its corner location. Herbert Cohen Cayton was a Honolulu-based architect who achieved a reputation for designing moderate-sized commercial buildings. In addition to this building, he was responsible for the Furneux Building (1927; Kamehameha Avenue and Furneax Lane) in Hilo, the Lum Yip Kee Building (1926; 1134–1136 Maunakea Street) in Honolulu, the Edgewater Apartments in Waikiki (demolished), and the Community Church in Ewa (OA173.5). Cohen graduated from the University of Chicago in 1902, and worked for the U.S. Treasury Department from 1907 to 1914. While in Chicago he married Irma Spitzer of Honolulu in 1908 and relocated to Hawaii as supervising architect for the Treasury Department when the Hilo Federal Building (HA36) was being planned.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "Young Building", [Hilo, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-HA29.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 264-264.

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