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Straughn Hall

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1930, Eric Fisher Wood and Co.

Straughn Hall's most striking feature is its vaguely Moorish polychromatic terra-cotta friezes. They visually dominate the symmetrically arranged sequence of brick-clad steel boxes that incrementally rise four levels to the auditorium's massively blunt rear fly gallery. Limestone trim outlining the central pavilion adds to the polychromy and the entrance's tall limestone arcade provides a monumental focal point. The building is named for William Ringgold Straughn, president of the school from 1914 to 1936. Eric Fisher Wood began his career in New York City but by the 1920s he had moved to Pittsburgh, where in association with Henry Hornbostel he designed many notable Art Deco buildings and, in Marion, Ohio, the Warren G. Harding Memorial (1925). C. Harry Kain served as Straughn Hall's project architect.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Straughn Hall", [Mansfield, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-TI1.2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 560-560.

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