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Jennie Lippitt Cottage (Stonewall Cottage)

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Stonewall Cottage
1873. 1026 East Shore Rd.

In summer a screen of foliage along the road offers no more than an oblique glimpse of the Jennie Lippitt Cottage, which is really a house in scale and situated on an accumulation of plats, as befitted a member of Conanicut's principal investing family. It even boasts the additional pomp of a mansarded tower, tucked into a corner of yet another instance of T-shaped massing. Mock pomp really, because the tower is rather diminutive under its high-hat mansard, while the T is spread—a short, off-center stem butting an extended crosspiece. Wherever second-story windows reach the slopes of the principal gables, they again cut through the eaves as hooded and ornamented semidormers, giving to this grander house the same low coziness this feature produces in the Irons Cottage. The deep porch fitted around the stem of the T and the tower is fronted by a railing infilled with scroll-cut, ornamented screening in the chalet manner, as is the vista balustrade off the mistress's bedroom upstairs. “Embowering” vines and bushes (as the Victorians might have described them) complete this picture of the idyllic summer retreat of the period.

Writing Credits

Author: 
William H. Jordy et al.
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Citation

William H. Jordy et al., "Jennie Lippitt Cottage (Stonewall Cottage)", [Jamestown, Rhode Island], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/RI-01-JA5.4.

Print Source

Buildings of Rhode Island, William H. Jordy, with Ronald J. Onorato and William McKenzie Woodward. New York: Oxford University Press, 2004, 588-588.

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