SAH Archipedia uses terms from the Getty Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) to categorize and classify metadata for the entries in the database. For more information on the Getty AAT, click here.

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triconchs
Three-apsed buildings, usually having a cross plan in which one arm of the cross is a flat-ended narthex and the remaining three arms terminate in apses.

triforiums
Stories in basilican church interiors that correspond to the level between the vaulting and the aisle roof, or the vaulting of the tribune and the tribune roof; may or may not contain a small passage. Distinct from "tribunes (stories)," which always have substantial passages.

trinity houses
Small 18th- and 19th-century Philadelphia row houses generally comprised of one room per floor for three floors.

triumphal arches (memorial arches)
Monumental structures containing at least one arched passageway and erected to honor an important person or to commemorate a significant event, particularly a victory in war. The basic form consisted of two piers connected by an arch, over which was placed a superstructure that served as a base for statues and bore commemorative inscriptions. Triumphal arches generally spanned a roadway used for triumphal processions. They are associated with ancient Roman architecture, however, they possibly developed elsewhere or from the Porta Triumphalis, which was a gate in Rome through which the victorious Roman army had to pass before entering the sacred city territory of Rome. "Arco onorario destinato a commemorare una vittoria militare. Nelle basiliche cristiane indica l'arco che divide la navata dal transetto o dal presbiterio."

trophies (war monuments)
Monuments erected as permanent reminders of military victories, usually containing images of the spoils of battle and often set up in the land of the vanquished. The design of these monuments was derived from the piles of arms and armor collected and displayed after Greek and Roman military victories. For the actual objects taken as spoils in war or hunting, or awarded as prizes for victory in contests, use "trophies (objects)."

truck routes
Roads or systems of roads reserved for trucks and other large vehicles; intended to avoid interference to and from local traffic and to improve road safety.

truck stops
Establishments, typically found in the United States, which provide refreshment, fuel, and services for truck-drivers and their vehichles.

truss arch bridges
Bridges having load-bearing superstructures employing both trusses and arches.

truss bridges
Bridges that employ trusses, which are structural members comprising straight pieces of metal or timber forming a series of triangles lying in a single plane, thus making the structure unlikely to be distorted by stress. Wooden truss bridges, in the form of covered bridges, were common in the United States from the 1870s to the 1930s; carefully fitted timbers were combined with iron rods for tension. Later, railroad bridges and other bridges were constructed of cast iron and wrought iron, which were eventually succeeded by steel in truss bridges.

truss bridges
Bridges that employ trusses, which are structural members comprising straight pieces of metal or timber forming a series of triangles lying in a single plane, thus making the structure unlikely to be distorted by stress. Wooden truss bridges, in the form of covered bridges, were common in the United States from the 1870s to the 1930s; carefully fitted timbers were combined with iron rods for tension. Later, railroad bridges and other bridges were constructed of cast iron and wrought iron, which were eventually succeeded by steel in truss bridges.

trusses (structural elements)
In engineering, structural members such as beams, bars, or rods, usually fabricated from straight pieces of metal or timber, that form a series of triangles lying in a single plane; based on the principle that a triangle cannot be easily distorted by stress. Trusses were probably first used in primitive lake dwellings during the early Bronze Age, about 2500 BCE. The first trusses were built of timber. The Greeks used trusses extensively in roofing; trusses were used for various construction purposes in the European Middle Ages. A major impetus to truss design came in the development of covered bridges in the United States in the early 19th century. Cast iron and wrought iron were succeeded by steel for railroad truss bridges. Trusses are also used extensively in machinery, such as cranes.

tundras
Areas of treeless, rolling terrain found in polar or alpine regions, typically covered with bare ground, rock, or such vegetation as mosses, lichens, and small shrubs.

tunnels
Subterranean passages, particularly roadways excavated under ground, under a hill or mountain, or beneath the bed of a river to allow passage of vehicles, trains, pedestrians, or animals.

Turkish baths
Buildings in which bathers pass through a succession of steam rooms of increasing temperature followed by spaces for rubdowns and massages. For Islamic public baths, use "hammams."

turnpikes
Refers either to high-speed multilane highways or 18th- and 19th-century thoroughfares along which tolls are collected from users; can be expressways or throughways.

turntables (rail transportation structure)
In the context of railroads, revolving platforms that turn on a central pivot laid with rails connected to adjacent tracks; used for turning railway vehicles.

turrets (theater components)
Refers to the upper parts of tiring houses in Elizabethan theaters, possibly used as music galleries and for sound effects.

turrets (towers)
Small towers, especially when corbelled out from a corner.

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