SAH Archipedia uses terms from the Getty Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) to categorize and classify metadata for the entries in the database. For more information on the Getty AAT, click here.

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pigsties
Enclosures for pigs that include a covered pen and yard.

pilasters
Shallow piers or rectangular columns projecting only slightly from a wall and, in classical architecture, conforming with one of the orders.(PDARC) Common also on furniture.

pilgrimage centers
Communities that grew up around or have economies centered on a site of religious pilgrimage and activities associated with the site.

pilot plants
Designates experimental facilities, usually small scaled-down versions of a planned plant, built to test manufacturing processes and generally gain experience prior to operating the final facility.

pit dwellings
Houses, common during the prehistoric periods of many cultures, whose floors are dug out deeply below the adjacent ground level. Use "sunken huts" for multipurpose buildings of the first millennium CE, found in England and throughout northern Europe.

pitched roofs
Designates roofs with one or more surfaces that have a pitch greater than 10 degrees from the horizontal.

pits (earthworks)
Cavities in the earth, usually not below ground water level, that are shallow in proportion to their width and generally created for materials extraction or burial.

pits (theater spaces)
Refers to the ground floors of theaters, especially those at the rear; most appropriate in an English and historical rather than a modern American context.

pivoted windows
Windows whose sash rotates about fixed vertical or horizontal pivots, located at or toward the center.

planetaria (buildings)
Buildings housing devices for projecting celestial images onto the interior of a dome for public viewing; may also be used for the projecting mechanisms. For mechanical models of the solar system, use "orreries."

planets
Large natural objects that orbit a star or a stellar remnant. Planets are not radiating energy from internal nuclear fusion reactions, are not a brown dwarfs, and are bigger than an asteroid. Planets are large enough to have become round due to the force of their own gravity, and dominate the neighborhood around their orbit, and are thus distinguished from dwarf planets.

planing mills
Establishments primarily engaged in producing surfaced lumber, by cutting, smoothing, and matching wood.

planned communities
Settlements or urban or suburban environments of any size that are developed according to a single plan, usually on a previously undeveloped site.

planned unit developments
Complexes designed as unified sites that include a mix of building types and uses, common open space, and controlled density increases, rather than lot-by-lot schemes.

plans (maps)
No description is available for this term.

plantation houses
Refers to the primary, and usually largest, residences on plantations.

plantation owners
People or groups of people who own and oversee the high-level operation of plantations, which are agricultural complexes usually worked by resident labor, often reserved for those in tropical or sub-tropical locations. The term often has negative connotations in modern usage, because many plantations relied upon slave labor in the 17th through 19th centuries.

plantations
Generally, agricultural complexes usually worked by resident labor. More specifically, large estates in tropical or subtropical regions that are usually cultivated by resident unskilled or semi-skilled labor under central direction. Meaning and usage overlap with "estates(commercial agricultural holding)," although such estates are typically smaller enterprises than plantations.

planters (containers)
Any of various containers in which plants are grown or placed for decorative purposes.

plateaus (landforms)
Tablelands or flat-topped areas of considerable extent elevated above the surrounding countryside and bounded on at least one side by a vertical face.

platform mounds
Artificial earthen mounds with a flat summit, intended to support a structure or activity. They were particularly prominent in the Pre-Columbian American cultures.

plats (land)
Areas of land generally characterized by being of medium size, often comprising an individual's property, often rectangular or of another regular shape, and defined by precise boundaries. Distinguished from "lots (land)," which are typically smaller, used for a single building, and often found in a town or urban environment rather than in the countryside.

playgrounds
Areas used play and recreation, especially by children, and often containing such equipment as swings, slides, seesaws, etc.

playrooms
Rooms fitted out or reserved for children to play in.

plazas (squares)
Small public squares in towns or landscaped pedestrian spaces adjacent to office buildings or parking areas.

pleasure gardens
Gardens, whether public or private, intended for enjoyment and amusement. Pleasure gardens may focus on flowers, shrubs, vegetables, and fruit trees, together with pedestrian paths, water features, mazes, vistas, etc.; typically enclosed by a wall or hedge. For larger areas having a similar purpose but without an enclosing wall and including woods, use "pleasure parks." Later pleasure gardens were sometimes open to the public and charged a fee for admittance.

podiums (building divisions)
Continuous pedestals or bases of buildings; appropriate for such elements in Roman or Etruscan temples. For similar features found in Greek temples prefer "stylobates."

pointed arches
Arches composed of two intersecting arcs of a circle, struck so that the apex of the arch is a point.

police academies (buildings)
Buildings that house schools for training individuals to become policemen, usually in accordance with state requirements.

police stations
Headquarters for the police of a particular district, from which police officers are dispatched and to which persons under arrest are brought.

polo fields
Outdoor or indoor areas of turf for play of the equestrian sport of polo. The outdoor polo field has dimensions of 300 x 160 yards, with goals located at each end between two vertical goal posts that are 24 feet apart and light enough to break in case of collision. Outdoor or indoor areas of turf for play of the equestrian sport of polo. The outdoor polo field has dimensions of 300 x 160 yards, with goals located at each end between two vertical goal posts that are 24 feet apart and light enough to break in case of collision.

polyclinics
Buildings that house clinics treating diseases and injuries of many sorts, offering broad general care that is usually on an outpatient basis. Polyclinics include hospital outpatient departments at a general practitioner health center or hospital in an urban or town environment, as well as facilities attached to major factories or other work places. They often contain reception and waiting rooms, a registration desk, consulting and treatment rooms, a pathological laboratory, X-ray facilities, physiotherapy areas, and small operating theaters.

polygonal
Having the form of a plane figure with three or more straight sides and the same number of angles.

polygons
Geometric plane figures having three or more straight sides and the same number of angles.

polytechnics (buildings)
Buildings that are distinguished from "universities" by traditionally providing space for training technicians in business, industry, and commerce for an immediate local area, having fewer residence facilities, and offering more part-time classes. For buildings housing educational institutions emphasizing training in agriculture or specific trades, use "vocational schools."

ponds (water)
Relatively small bodies of water, usually surrounded on all sides by land.

pool halls
Refers to public establishments equipped with pool and/or billiard tables.

pools (bodies of water)
Still bodies of water smaller than ponds.

porches
Use to designate roofed spaces, open along two or more sides and adjunct to a building, commonly serving either to shelter an entrance or used as living space.

portable buildings
Buildings designed to be movable rather than permanently located.

porte-cochères
Projecting roofs or porchlike structures that shelter vehicles and passengers at the entrances to buildings; also for short vehicular tunnels through buildings, sheltering an entrance.

porticoes
Roofed porchlike spaces, open along at least one side and usually associated with an entrance, supported by columns and often surmounted by a pediment; porticoes may project from the main building mass or be recessed in it.

ports (settlements)
Settlement areas possessing a harbor and terminal facilities used for loading or unloading, or water transportation. By extension, the term is also applied to such areas facilitating air transportation.

ports of entry
Places such as harbors, airports, or border crossing facilities through which people and goods may lawfully enter a country.

post exchanges
Shops at military posts where goods and services are available to military personnel and authorized civilians, whether the goods are provided by the military or by a sutler.

post offices
Public buildings within a government postal system at which mail is received and sorted, from which it is distributed, and at which stamps are sold and other services rendered.

post-and-beam structures
Structures based on upright posts or columns supporting horizontal beams or lintels; these exclude balloon frames and platform frames, in which support is by stud walls.

potter's fields
Public burial places for paupers, unknown persons, and criminals.

potteries (manufactories)
Establishments that specialize in making clay pottery, such as earthen pots or vessels.

poultry houses
Structures constructed for or used to shelter poultry, having either a large open space provided with food, water, and roosting areas, often with an accessible opening to the outdoors, or a series of small pens containing one or two animals raised for meat or to produce eggs.

powder magazines
Military storage buildings for priming powder and similar explosives.

powder mills
Refers to factories in which gunpowder is made.

power plants
Complexes of buildings and other structures with machinery for generating electricity. For individual buildings in which electricity, or other forms of power, are generated for the operation of machinery or vehicles, or supplying power to other buildings in a complex, use "powerhouses."

powerhouses
Buildings in which electricity or other forms of power are generated for the operation of machinery or vehicles, or supplying power to other buildings in a complex; distinguished from "power plants" which are complexes producing power on a much larger scale.

praetoriums
In the ancient Roman Empire, the official residences of provincial governors.

prairies
Extensive unwooded grasslands, usually flat or gently rolling; found in the central portions of North America.

Pratt trusses
Trusses having parallel chords, vertical members in compression, and diagonal members (which slant toward the center) in tension.

Pre-Columbian (American)
Refers to the aboriginal Native American cultures that developed in North, South and Central America before the arrival of Europeans beginning in the late 15th century CE. The term is sometimes used more narrowly to only refer to early cultures from Mexico and Central and South America.

precincts
Districts within a city, town, or other community marked out for specific governmental or administrative purposes, such as for electoral, school, or police services.

prefabrication
The making of components, usually standardized and factory-made, that are later assembled during the construction of an object or structure.

prehistoric sites
Sites that contain evidence of prehistoric human activity, often through archaeological investigation.

preparatory schools (buildings)
Buildings that house private schools intended to prepare students for more advanced formal education.

presidential libraries (buildings)
Buildings housing institutions that are typically more like museums or archives than libraries, containing the papers and sometimes exhibits about a given U.S. president and his administration.

presidential residences
Dwellings built for or inhabited by the president of a nation.

presidios
Military settlements established by the Spanish in America often as garrisoned forts or outposts.

press boxes
The quarters assigned as working space for media personnel, as at sporting events and political conventions, and usually equipped with communications facilities.

print shops (stores)
Printsellers' shops, that is, stores in which the primary items for sale are prints.

printing plants
Facilities, office, or business where the printing of books or other works takes place.

printing presses
Devices used to transfer an impression from type, blocks, plates, or stones to a surface, usually paper.

priories
Religious houses that rank immediately below abbeys and are presided over by a prior or prioress.

prisons (buildings)
Buildings or other facilities to which people are legally committed as punishment for a crime or while awaiting trial. In North America, the term specifically denotes a facility run by the state or federal government for those who have been convicted of serious crimes, in contrast to a locally run facility for those awaiting trial or convicted of minor offences. As developed since the late 18th century, prisons are generally characterized by cell and corridor plans with separation by offense and sex, and programs of rehabilitation provided as means toward prisoner reform. Use "jails (buildings)" for places for offenders sentenced either for lesser crimes or relatively short terms.

prisons (institutions)
Institutions having facilities where people are legally committed as punishment for a crime or while awaiting trial. In North America, the term specifically denotes a facility run by the state or federal government for those who have been convicted of serious crimes, in contrast to a locally run facility for those awaiting trial or convicted of minor offences. Use "jails (institutions)" for facilities for offenders sentenced either for lesser crimes or relatively short terms.

private chapels
Rooms or other relatively small places set aside for worship by an individual, family, or small group, where no public services are provided. A private chapel may be within the confines of a larger church, home, or other larger building; it may also be a free standing structure.

private gardens
Originally, gardens designed to reflect the power and largesse of the aristocracy. Contemporary usage extends to gardens maintained by individuals that are somehow enclosed or secluded, regardless of size, and that may evoke the fanciful or fantastic. Variations of the private garden may be designed to house a collection of artworks, or to highlight a particular plant genus.

private libraries (buildings)
Buildings or spaces housing lbraries that are formed by the collections of individuals rather than as a public institution.

private libraries (institutions)
Libraries formed by the collections of individuals rather than as a public institution and often devoted to a particular subject or interest.

private schools (buildings)
Buildings that house schools that are established, conducted, and primarily supported by a nongovernmental agency and available to a limited set of students.

private schools (institutions)
Educational institutions that are established, conducted, and primarily supported by a nongovernmental agency and available to a limited set of students.

privies
Rooms or spaces that are within buildings and have one or more seats and a pit used as toilets which lack plumbing facilities, distinguished from "outhouses" which are separate structures in domestic contexts containing similar arrangements of toilet facilities. For rooms or spaces with toilets having plumbing, use "bathrooms" or "lavatories (rooms)."

processing plants
Facilities established or used to transform, alter, or treat a product or other thing by using a special process or technique, including operating upon the thing mechanically or chemically.

projection booths
Rooms at the rear of auditoriums or classrooms for the operation of, usually, motion-picture projectors, slide projectors, or spotlights.

promenades (walkways)
Places for strolling; public walks.

promontories
Bluffs or prominent hills overlooking or projecting into a lowland. For high features projecting into a sea, use "headlands."

psychiatric hospitals
Hospital facilities where those with mental disorders are confined for observation and treatment.

public art
Art and architectural elements having the purpose of beautifying and enriching public places rather than private spaces, whether or not the works are also functional. For art undertaken in conjunction with particular communities, usually to produce an effect or inspire response specifically within those communities, use "community art." For art associated with urban design, planning, and preservation, use "municipal art."

public baths
Buildings equipped with swimming pools and other facilities for bathing and swimming, traditionally the primary hygienic facility in a city or town.

public buildings (governmental buildings)
Buildings or groups of buildings owned and operated by a governing body, carrying out official duties, and often occupied by a governmental agency.

public gardens
Planned spaces that are open to the public, usually located outdoors, and focused on plants and other natural or landscaped features.

public housing
Low cost housing, owned, sponsored, or administered by a municipal or other governmental agency.

public land
Land owned by the government.

public libraries (buildings)
Buildings or spaces housing collections of books that are available to the public and typically maintained by public funds, as distinguished from libraries available only to a certain group or individual.

public libraries (institutions)
Libraries that are available to the public and typically maintained by public funds, as distinguished from libraries available only to a certain group or individual.

public parks
No description is available for this term.

public safety buildings
Buildings housing offices concerned with health matters, disaster management, and other issues surrounding the public safety of a community.

public schools (buildings)
Buildings that house schools maintained at public expense for the education of children of a community or district as part of a free education system; generally includes elementary and high schools.

public schools (institutions)
Educational institutions maintained at public expense for the education of children of a community or district as part of a free education system; generally includes elementary and high schools.

public sculpture
Sculptural works installed in public places and thus accessible and visible to all members of the community.

public spaces
Open spaces designed for public use or are accesible to the public, often designed to foster a sense of community.

public transit (infrastructure)
Transit systems, buses, trains, etc., that run on fixed routes at set times and may be used by any person, either free or subject to a fare.

publishing houses
Businesses that make books and other works of writers and songwriters available to the public, traditionally through books or other printed materials.

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