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Sourdough Roadhouse

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1906
  • Sourdough Roadhouse
  • Sourdough Roadhouse

Advertising itself as the oldest roadhouse still operating in its original building, Sourdough Roadhouse was built on the Valdez-Fairbanks trail in 1906. Known originally as Pollard's, from 1908 to 1922 Nellie Yeager operated it, calling it Sourdough Roadhouse and Trading Post. Constructed of round logs, saddle notched at the corners, the one-story building has a gable roof formed of sod on poles and covered with metal. Several additions have extended the roadhouse to the south. The living room and bar were located in the original section, with living quarters for the proprietor behind. Next to it was the dining room and store, and at the end, the kitchen. These same uses prevail today, except that the proprietor's quarters have been replaced by a liquor store. Designated a National Historic Landmark, the roadhouse is important not only for its age and architecture but also for the road itself—a vital early connection.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Alison K. Hoagland
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Data

Citation

Alison K. Hoagland, "Sourdough Roadhouse", [Gakona, Alaska], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AK-01-SC122.

Print Source

Buildings of Alaska, Alison K. Hoagland. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 154-154.

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