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Sixth Street

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Between Gold and Seward streets

Montgomery and Frances Davis built several houses on Sixth Street, one for themselves and the rest to rent. J. Montgomery Davis was an English-born prospector and miner who came to Juneau in 1891 as bookkeeper and assistant manager of the Nowell Gold Mining Company. He soon married Frances Brooks, a wealthy English painter who had come to Juneau to observe the gold rush.

Between 1892 and 1912, the Davises built a number of houses for rental, including those located at 132, 136, 226, 232, and 238 Sixth Street. These are one and a half stories with a gable front and are sided in clapboards, beveled siding, or shingles. The three houses at 312, 312A, and 312B Sixth Street are set sideways to the street. Also one-and-a-half stories with gable fronts, these houses have front bay windows on the downhill sides. The juxtaposition of owner-occupied and rental housing is made clear by the architectural distinction between the two; there is no doubt which is the owner's house.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Alison K. Hoagland
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Data

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Citation

Alison K. Hoagland, "Sixth Street", [Juneau, Alaska], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AK-01-SE022.

Print Source

Buildings of Alaska, Alison K. Hoagland. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 176-176.

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