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Hopkinswoode

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1914. 914 Combs Ave.

Clarence and Laura Hopkins came from Missouri to settle in Cotter around 1906 when the town became a railroad hub. They eventually owned several commercial enterprises, including a lumber company and a bank. Their two-story house is built primarily of uncut limestone and granite found on the property, and the various sizes and colors of the stone give the exterior a striking richness. Wood shingles line the gables. Arts and Crafts influences are clear in the house’s horizontal proportions, the deep eaves, and the emphasis on the various textures of the materials. The poured concrete columns that support the wraparound porch are not original to the house. A frame barn is still on the property. The house is now a bed-and-breakfast.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors
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Citation

Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors, "Hopkinswoode", [Cotter, Arkansas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AR-01-BA1.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Arkansas

Buildings of Arkansas, Cyrus A. Sutherland and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 79-79.

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