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Pattie Cobb Hall, Harding University

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1919; 1988 renovated. 907 E. Center St.

This residence hall at the center of the campus was originally constructed for the Galloway Female College, which was established in 1889 and affiliated with the Methodist Church. The hall was one of two buildings remaining when Harding College, a Church of Christ–affiliated school, moved to Searcy in 1934, took over the college, and made it co-educational. The three-story red brick Colonial Revival building with white trim has two-story porches at each end with Ionic columns and white painted wooden railings and a roof balustrade. The building faces a quadrangle dotted with mature trees. Later buildings on the campus have followed the hall’s general styling and materials.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors
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Citation

Cyrus A. Sutherland with Gregory Herman, Claudia Shannon, Jean Sizemore Jeannie M. Whayne and Contributors, "Pattie Cobb Hall, Harding University", [Searcy, Arkansas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/AR-01-WH5.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Arkansas

Buildings of Arkansas, Cyrus A. Sutherland and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 242-242.

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