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Amtrak Depot (D&RG Depot)

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D&RG Depot
1904, Theodore von Rosenberg? 413 7th St. between Cooper and Blake sts.
  • (Carol M. Highsmith Archive, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)

This red brick station is trimmed in rough-faced purple, gray, and red sandstone which also forms the first-story walls. Above a rough stone base with round-arched windows, ornate brick-work with Neoclassical wooden trim focuses on a central entry canopy with Ionic pilasters, under a red tile hipped roof with wide, flaring eaves and clipped gables.

The dominant design elements, twin towers with open viewing porches, echo the towers of the Hotel Colorado. The depot's stonework and some details also relate to the hot springs resort just across the river. Inside, some of the original oak wain-scoting and brass fixtures survive between a linoleum floor and lowered acoustic tile ceiling. The trackside facade features a five-bay window with curved glass corners.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Amtrak Depot (D&RG Depot)", [Glenwood Springs, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-GF04.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 481-481.

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