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Loveland Block–Territorial Capitol

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1863–1866, Duncan E. Harrison, builder. 1991, renovation, Andrews and Anderson. 1122 Washington Ave. (northwest corner of 12th St.)

The Colorado Territorial Legislature met here in 1866–1867, supposedly because William A. H. Loveland offered the legislators use of his building and townsfolk offered free firewater and firewood. Loveland, Golden's prime promoter, also presided over the Colorado Central Railroad, which hoped to make Golden, not Denver, the rail hub of the Colorado Territory. This two-story, red brick structure, built in stages, was designed with a mansard roof and generous, round-arched window and door openings. After the territorial government moved to Denver, the Jefferson County government met here until the first courthouse was built in 1877. The third floor and mansard roof have been removed and the main street facade remodeled with new windows and doors. After a 1991 renovation, the venerable hall reopened as a bar and restaurant.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Loveland Block–Territorial Capitol", [Golden, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-JF07.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 152-152.

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