You are here

Logan County Courthouse

-A A +A
1909, John J. Huddart. Main to Ash sts, between 3rd and 4th streets (NR)

Occupying a full, tree-shaded block, this Neoclassical edifice has a metal-clad dome and many protruding bays. The formal, three-story design is executed in beige-white brick, with terracotta for quoins, keystones, and trim. The pedimented north entry with its ornate medallion and exaggerated keystone is flanked by pairs of columns with Ionic capitals. Stained glass skylights brighten the four-story interior rotunda, restored in 1984, returning luster to its Colorado Yule marble and ornate tile floors, its golden oak trim, wrought iron staircase, and brass railings. The interior restoration also revived many rich classical details, replaced 4,000 broken floor tiles with hand-cut duplicates, and refurbished the original golden oak jury chairs.

Denver architect John Huddart, who trained in England and as a draftsman for Frank Edbrooke in Denver, designed government buildings over a span of four decades in Colorado, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Wyoming, including a number of Colorado county courthouses.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Logan County Courthouse", [Sterling, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-LO01.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 256-256.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,