You are here

Cleveholm Manor and Gatekeeper's Lodge

-A A +A
1902, Boal and Harnois. 18679 Pitkin County 133 (NR)

John Osgood built his own home a mile away from Redstone, up the Crystal River. The forty-two-room Tudor Revival mansion, completed in 1903 at a cost of $2.5 million, is an English manor house transplanted to a verdant mountain valley. It is built of big sandstone blocks quarried just across the river and half-timbered and shingled on the third story. Red sandstone with white sandstone trim and Tudor arches organize a fanciful, irregular composition. The lavish, well-maintained interior boasts fourteen onyx or marble fireplaces, solid mahogany wood-work, Tiffany lamps, and hand-tooled leather covering the library walls. Stone lions on gate pillars guard the 450-acre grounds, which once included a nine-hole golf course, a T-bar ski lift, and stables. A gazebo, gatehouse, and pumphouse survive. The south gatehouse has been moved to Grand Junction and opened as a bed and breakfast; the large greenhouse is now on the west side of Glenwood Springs, where its towering sandstone chimney may be seen from I-70. Osgood died at Cleveholm in 1926, twenty-three years after losing control of CF&I and Redstone to John D. Rockefeller. His home is now a splendid bed and breakfast inn.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Cleveholm Manor and Gatekeeper's Lodge", [, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-PT37.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 499-500.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,