You are here

Mayflower Hotel

-A A +A
1924, Warren and Wetmore, Robert Beresford. Connecticut Ave. at DeSales St. NW
  • Mayflower Hotel
  • Mayflower Hotel

Warren and Wetmore, architects of Grand Central Terminal in New York, designed the venerable Mayflower Hotel. Robert Beresford of Washington assisted the firm in executing the design. The Mayflower offered first-class hotel accommodations, dining rooms, and ballrooms in the sections of the building closest to Connecticut Avenue. To the rear, with its own private entrance off a quiet street, was the apartment house tower. Today, nearly all of the apartments have been converted to hotel rooms and the public rooms restored to their original elegance.

The Mayflower Hotel rises ten stories and extends east an entire city block from Connecticut Avenue to 17th Street. The buff brick building is set upon a limestone base. Its main facade on Connecticut Avenue is shaped into a pair of curved towers flanking a deep narrow court above the hotel's main entrance. Stone quoins set off the building's corner. Classical urns and carved cornucopias, wreaths, and swags adorn the facade. On the interior, a grand lobby encrusted with plaster ceilings, marble, and gilding extends the length of the building.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee, "Mayflower Hotel", [Washington, District of Columbia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DC-01-DW10.

Print Source

Buildings of the District of Columbia, Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 225-225.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,