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Overlook Colony

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1911–1917, John Nolen. Vicinity of Commonwealth Ave. and Philadelphia Pike (U.S. 13)

General Chemical Company developed this planned community for its employees. Nolen, a landscape architect and city planner from Boston, wrote extensively and had been involved in plans for Chattanooga, Tennessee; Glen Ridge, New Jersey; and La Crosse, Wisconsin. The well-designed Arts and Crafts row homes were faced in stucco and had slate roofs. All are privately owned today and have been altered. The restored community center on Commonwealth Avenue received a preservation award in 2000. Additional workers' communities in Claymont include Worthland, for Worth Steel (with a Tudor Revival clubhouse), and Aniline Village. All these bear comparison to postwar Brookview Apartments (1952, south of Darley Road), in a modernist idiom that included steel corner windows. Once a desirable garden apartment complex, Brookview is now slated for demolition.

Writing Credits

Author: 
W. Barksdale Maynard
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Data

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Citation

W. Barksdale Maynard, "Overlook Colony", [Claymont, Delaware], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DE-01-BR5.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Delaware

Buildings of Delaware, W. Barksdale Maynard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008, 36-36.

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