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North State Street Houses

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19th and 20th centuries. N. State St.

Among the notable homes is Number 2, the Mifflin House (1879–1885), built in green serpentine and brick by a peach canner. Dr. Henry Ridgely erected Number 6 (1869) on a busy corner, a towered house of brick with red stone quoins. Richardson Hall (c. 1890 and later), Number 29, was built by Senator Harry A. Richardson, a wealthy canner. Its brick turret was added between 1904 and 1910. The family sold the place to Wesley College in the 1950s. Redevelopment schemes for Richardson Hall (as it was named) were controversial for years. An assisted living facility was built on the grounds in 1999 and Richardson Hall was restored. The house at Number 300 was originally the Allee Mansion, remodeled as the Tudor Manor Hotel (1929–1930). The Delaware corporation law, under which, by 1938, one-fifth of U.S. corporations were chartered in Dover, hugely increased the need for hotels in town. Owing to the Great Depression, this one was never completed to its intended size.

Writing Credits

Author: 
W. Barksdale Maynard
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Data

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Citation

W. Barksdale Maynard, "North State Street Houses", [Dover, Delaware], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DE-01-DV4.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Delaware

Buildings of Delaware, W. Barksdale Maynard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008, 249-250.

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