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ING Direct (Kent Building)

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Kent Building
c. 1885. 2000 renovation, Tevebaugh Associates, with Cecil Baker and Associates. Orange and Water sts.

A Dutch banking firm, ING, helped transform Wilmington's riverfront starting in 2000 by renovating three old structures. This rather plain brick warehouse had long loomed above the waterfront. Photographs from the 1920s show it as Bird Transfer Company, a hauling and storage facility. Tevebaugh's initial plan was for thirty-two apartment units, but this proved unfeasible. ING then bought and renovated the building, calling it “The Pakhaus,” Dutch for warehouse. The nearby J. Morton Poole Buildings, of about the same date, once housed a firm that manufactured metal rollers for papermaking. A part of the Poole complex was renovated by a Wilmington firm (1984, Moeckel Carbonell Associates) as architectural offices in the earliest phase of riverfront improvements.

Writing Credits

Author: 
W. Barksdale Maynard
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Citation

W. Barksdale Maynard, "ING Direct (Kent Building)", [Wilmington, Delaware], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DE-01-WL7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Delaware

Buildings of Delaware, W. Barksdale Maynard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2008, 91-91.

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