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Ah Doi Seto Building

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1921. 4556 Awawa Rd.

Picturesquely overhanging the west bank of Hanapepe River, this two-story, single-wall building resulted from the connection of two smaller buildings of 1919 into one structure by Ah Doi Seto. His remodeling also added a second story and cantilevered a portion of the building over the river. It served as both a market and the family's residence, with the commercial operations in the front; storage, kitchen, and dining in the rear; and the second floor devoted to living quarters. The Seto market was one of several buildings once running along the west bank to extend over the river. Today it is the sole reminder of that enchanting scene. With its second-story wraparound verandah, corner entrance, and prominent position abutting the bridge, the structure remains a distinctive Hanapepe landmark. Damage by Hurricane Iniki led to the building's rehabilitation in 1994, under the direction of architect Boone Morrison.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "Ah Doi Seto Building", [Hanapepe, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-KA12.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 56-57.

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