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Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church at Kaluaaha

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1874; 1965 reconstructed. Kamehameha V Hwy., between mile markers 14 and 15

Our Lady of Sorrows is an immaculate, unpretentious, frame church, a vernacular rendering of the New England type with Gothic-arched windows on the sides. The other extant topside church associated with Father Damien, it predates St. Joseph's Catholic Church (ML9) by two years. Not only was it Damien's first church building project on Molokai, it also marked one of the earliest historic preservation efforts on the island. Unfortunately, this resulted in the church being reconstructed from the ground up without regard for nineteenth-century building methods or materials. Many of the original furnishings, however, remain, as do the altars and much of the chancel's woodwork. The chancel's classicism, with its pilaster-supported pediment, is similar to, but slightly heavier than, that at St. Joseph's church.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church at Kaluaaha", [Kaunakakai, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-ML11.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 232-233.

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