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Kalama Beach Park (Charles Boettcher House)

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Charles Boettcher House
1937, Vladimir Ossipoff. 248 N. Kalaheo Ave.

An early Ossipoff house designed shortly after he went into independent practice, this four-thousand square-foot residence exudes the regionalist sensitivity for which Ossipoff later became famous. With its deep lanai and flowing, double-pitched hipped rooflines, the pavilion-shaped dwelling integrates with its surrounding environment. The lanai's brown, acid-stained floor includes an incised tapa-inspired design, which is repeated in the pocket sliding doors and screened openings. The house had eight rooms with six baths. Originally a winter home for Mr. and Mrs. Boettcher from Colorado, in 1978, Mrs. Boettcher donated the property to the City and County of Honolulu for use as a beach park. As a result, this four-acre parcel has remained intact, a rare undivided beachfront lot in Kailua, and a gracious reminder of an earlier era in Hawaii's history.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "Kalama Beach Park (Charles Boettcher House)", [Kailua, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-OA164.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 173-173.

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