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Saint John's Episcopal Church

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1883–1888, Appleton and Stephenson. Northeast corner of N. 4th and Concert streets

Saint John's Church was specifically modeled after an Episcopal church at Jamaica Plain, a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. The Boston architectural firm of Appleton and Stephenson was engaged to prepare plans. Work on the church started in 1884 and it was completed in 1888. The church almost seems to be a small-scale afterthought to its great four-story crenellated tower. The style of this stone church revives the late English Perpendicular Gothic. The interior, as is usually the case with Episcopal churches, is modest in size, but luxuriously and tastefully carried out. This is especially evident in the woodwork of the roof and in the many leaded and stained glass windows. With the open, parklike space around the building, the church assumes even more strongly the image of an English village church.

Writing Credits

Author: 
David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim
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Citation

David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim, "Saint John's Episcopal Church", [Keokuk, Iowa], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/IA-01-ME260.

Print Source

Buildings of Iowa, David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 110-110.

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