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Saint Matthews-by-the-Bridge Episcopal Church

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c. 1912. Southwest corner of Oak (US 65) and the railroad

Episcopal churches in small communities are usually diminutive, but this one is really delightfully tiny. The sanctuary is housed within a narrow gabled structure perched on the very top of the river bank. An appendage projects slightly toward the street, its shed roof interrupted by two small gable roofs. The larger of these is the entrance, and its gable is carried up as a parapet, with a cross mounted at its apex. The door itself is sheltered by a projecting hood, similar to those often employed by the turn-of-the-century English architect Charles F. A. Voysey. The walls of the building are sheathed in brown stucco, the wood trim is painted red, and the shingle roof is green. As a design, the church is related to the English and the American Arts and Crafts movements.

Writing Credits

Author: 
David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim
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Citation

David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim, "Saint Matthews-by-the-Bridge Episcopal Church", [Iowa Falls, Iowa], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/IA-01-NO202.

Print Source

Buildings of Iowa, David Gebhard and Gerald Mansheim. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 406-406.

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