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356 Boylston Street (Women's Educational and Industrial Union)

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Women's Educational and Industrial Union
1906, Parker and Thomas.

Though only two stories in height, this purpose-built commercial structure attains a significant presence on the streetscape through its unusual width and the richness of its storefront detailing. Below the second floor, whose ten single-light windows are set within narrow piers, the two outer storefront bays have suffered unsympathetic alterations. The wide show windows of the undisturbed center bays are defined by pilasters entwined with low-relief rinceaux. Above the arched recess of the central entrance hangs the three-dimensional gilded swan that has become synonymous with its longtime tenant, the retail shop of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union, incorporated in 1877, the year following the introduction of the swan boats in the Boston Public Garden (BB1). In 2004, the Women's Union decided to sell their building to seek quarters more appropriate to their current mission.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "356 Boylston Street (Women's Educational and Industrial Union)", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-BB24.

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