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Richmond Court

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1898, Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson. 1209–1217 Beacon St.
  • Richmond Court (NR/NRD)

One block west of Temple Ohabei Shalom (BR5) stands Richmond Court, Cram, Goodhue and Ferguson's garden court apartment block. At a time when most Boston-area developers were building apartment houses that maximized the buildable square footage, Richmond Court included a landscaped courtyard with a sculptured fountain and nymph by Lee Lawrie. Cram planned forty nine-room apartments around five separate entrances off the courtyard. The development also included two separate town houses on either side of the apartment block. A poor Tudor imitation, called Hampton Court, rose next door in 1903, causing Cram later to regret his use of the English Tudor for Richmond Court. Designed by Charles Park, this later apartment block featured a halfhearted effort at providing a central courtyard, which has since been eliminated by a glass and steel in-fill.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Richmond Court", [Brookline, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-BR6.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 496-496.

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