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M. Harriet McCormick Performing Arts Center (Strand Theater)

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Strand Theater
1917–1918, Funk and Wilcox; 1979, William Reisman and Associates. 543 Columbia Rd.
  • M. Harriet McCormick Performing Arts Center (Strand Theater)

Located among densely built-up early-twentieth-century commercial blocks at Upham's Corner, the Strand was the earliest movie palace in suburban Boston. Nathan Gordon, a New England theater mogul who began his career in Worcester in 1903 and eventually owned a chain of seventy-five theaters, built it. Funk and Wilcox created a narrow facade in the form of a classical proscenium arch with a monumental lunette at the second-floor level. Above is a parapet emblazoned with the name “Strand.” William Reisman and Associates restored the interior with its Adamesque ornamentation.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "M. Harriet McCormick Performing Arts Center (Strand Theater)", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-DR11.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 258-258.

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