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Harriswood Crescent

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1890, J. Williams Beal. 60–88 Harold St.
  • Harriswood Crescent (NR)

Epitomizing the rapid suburbanization of Roxbury in the late nineteenth century, Harriswood Crescent forms a block of English Tudor houses opposite Harris Park. The park, characterized by a rocky terrain with mature trees, was established in 1852 and improved in 1907 and 1912, the last time by the Olmsted Brothers. Beal's designs for the row of houses along the east side of the park are unusual for Boston. Trained at MIT and in the offices of New York architects Richard Morris Hunt and McKim, Mead and White, Beal produced a design more typical of the urban areas of New York or Pennsylvania. Built as fifteen separate units, the picturesque composition appears as a row of seven houses unified by variations in Tudor Revival decorative motifs.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Harriswood Crescent", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-RX25.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 251-251.

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