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Atelier|505

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2004, Machado and Silvetti Associates. 505 Tremont St.
  • Atelier|505

At the intersection of Berkeley and Tremont streets with Warren Avenue, Atelier|505 has stimulated further the gentrification of the South End with a 103-unit luxury condominium building that offers all urban amenities, two new theaters, and commercial spaces. Four distinct elements compose the massive structure. A four-story brick unit along Warren Avenue reflects the scale and materials of the Victorian town houses across the street. A ten-story cast-stone tower at the corner of Tremont and Berkeley streets contains the entrance to the complex and joins a nine-story brick section along Tremont Street. A three-story metal and glass pavilion next to the Cyclorama (SE3) entrance encloses the new theaters. Street-level shops and restaurants ring the building. Once inside, residents can enjoy a third-floor fitness center with saunas and massage room and a residents' suite with library, terraced garden, and rooms for entertaining. For nonresidents, the new theaters and support space for the Boston Center for the Arts (SE3) and the Huntington Theater Company expand the cultural offerings of this neighborhood.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Atelier|505", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-SE2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 133-133.

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