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Cutler Majestic Theater, Emerson College

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1901–1903, John Galen Howard and James M. Wood; 2003 restoration, Elkus/Manfredi Architects. 219–221 Tremont St.
  • Cutler Majestic Theater, Emerson College

The only Boston design by John Galen Howard, first director of the School of Architecture, University of California, Berkeley, the Cutler Majestic Theater was built through the generosity of Eben Jordan, son of the founder of the Jordan Marsh and Company department store. The tan terra-cotta facade boasts three arched entrances ornamented by cast-fruit moldings, all surmounted by a monumental triple arcade framed by Ionic columns. The house originally seated 1,700 in high-relief Rococo splendor. Henry B. Pennell collaborated on the interior decoration, employing William de Leftwich Dodge to paint the lobby murals of frolicking nymphs. Jordan also supported the construction of two other Boston theaters, Jordan Hall at the New England Conservatory (see FL6; 1902) and the Boston Opera House (1909), now demolished. After its use as a movie theater for many years, Emerson College acquired the Majestic in 1983 for student productions and for road company shows.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Cutler Majestic Theater, Emerson College", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-TD11.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 126-126.

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