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Hazard Quadrangle

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1903 competition; 1903–1904 Pomeroy; Cazenove; 1908 Beebe; 1909 Shafer; 1916–1919 link between Pomeroy and Cazenove, Julius Schweinfurth. Wellesley College.

This residential quadrangle was named for Caroline Hazard, president of the college during its erection. Its location on Route 135 reflects her desire to open the campus to the outside world. Schweinfurth won the competition for the commission by closely following a layout proposed by Frederick Law Olmsted Jr. The Elizabethan style, then fashionable in collegiate work, was requested by the donor, championed by the president, and dictated by the terms of the competition. The four L-shaped plans originally housed servants' quarters in the short wings. The interiors were originally decorated and furnished in the spirit of the Boston Arts and Crafts ideal (since removed).

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Hazard Quadrangle", [Wellesley, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-WL11.1.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 517-517.

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