You are here

Holy Epiphany Russian Orthodox Church

-A A +A
1970–1971, Paul P. Pavlov. 963 South St., Roslindale.

Trained in the Imperial College of St. Petersburg, Paul P. Pavlov designed over thirty churches and buildings throughout the Russian Empire during the reign of Czar Nicholas II. Heavily indebted to the medieval Russian Novgorod/Pskov style, Holy Epiphany Russian Orthodox Church rises from a cube plan with a wide central space culminating in a vaulted dome. On the exterior, rendered in all-header yellow brick, a lantern with an elongated onion cupola rises from a hipped roof, with a smaller variation over the gable entrance. The entrance porch and shallow transepts exhibit modified barrel roofs, a translation from Russian wooden church architecture. The iconographic program throughout the interior represents the celestial hierarchy. Artists arranged the main icon panels on the solid screen of the iconostasis in a traditional theological scheme. In the center, the Royal Doors open to view the altar. On the left the Preparation Door conceals Eucharistic vessels; on the right the Vestry Door leads to the sanctuary for sacred books, gospels, and relics.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Holy Epiphany Russian Orthodox Church", [Boston, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-WR5.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 274-274.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,