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Oakhill (Chauncey M. and Emily L. Brewer House)

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Chauncey M. and Emily L. Brewer House
1859. 410 N. Eagle St.

Magnificent Oakhill stands atop a steep hill on the northern edge of Marshall overlooking the town and open fields to the northeast. This Italianate house once dominated some sixty-four acres of farmland. Chauncey M. Brewer (1814–1889), a pioneer who came from Oneonta, New York, to Marshall in 1835 and who achieved prominence in merchandising, banking, and local politics, built it. The eighteen-room, red brick house is a two-and-a-half-story cube with a square belvedere on the roof and a wide, columned veranda that sweeps from the front around to the building's side. Paired brackets support the roof. A two-story, rectangular addition is on the west. The interior is profusely decorated with marble fireplaces, wrought-metal chandeliers, and stained glass window panels.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Oakhill (Chauncey M. and Emily L. Brewer House)", [Marshall, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-CA21.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 207-207.

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