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Joseph Harris House

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c. 1916. 165 Washington Ave.

This massive stuccoed foursquare house has a distinctive heavy front porch of four low segmental arches resting on five heavy square posts and topped with a parapet, the outside bay serving as a porte-cochere. A low gabled dormer is over the center of the entrance. The general horizontality, the generous overhang, the rectangular wall panels, and the low hipped roof characterize the Prairie Style. The house possesses all the characteristics of the foursquare house form, as Clem Labine and Patricia Poore defined the term in the Old House Journal for January 1982, and as Alan Gowans developed it in The Comfortable House (1986). It is two stories on a raised basement, has a veranda running the full width of the first story, and is capped by a low pyramidal roof that contains dormers. As well, it probably has an interior plan of four nearly equal-sized rooms per floor.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Joseph Harris House", [Iron River, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-IR6.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 521-521.

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