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77 Monroe Center (Grand Rapids Trust Building, Michigan National Bank Building)

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Grand Rapids Trust Building, Michigan National Bank Building
1926, Wirt C. Rowland of Smith, Hinchman and Grylls. 77 Monroe Center NW

The strong, continuous piers terminating in pinnacles and the dominant three-story arches on the lower levels, with narrower arched forms repeated in the upper portions, give this building a vigorous vertical thrust. In fact, it seems almost a provocative transformation of H. H. Richardson's Marshall Field Store in Chicago into a vertical building. The exterior is sheathed in terra-cotta with reliefs by Corrado Joseph Parducci. Depicting the early history of the city, they include Indian tomahawks, canoes, pine trees, wolverines, and other native animals. The colonnaded second-floor banking room and safe deposit vaults are enriched with marble, terrazzo, and metalwork.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "77 Monroe Center (Grand Rapids Trust Building, Michigan National Bank Building)", [Grand Rapids, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-KT10.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 250-250.

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