You are here

John W. and Polly Parkhurst Day House

-A A +A
1856. 4985 Dryden Rd.

Unusual ornamentation decorates this wooden Greek Revival house in the agricultural center of Dryden. It is a two-story, three-bay, main temple-front building with a single-story ell. Four attenuated full-height Ionic columns support the pedimented portico. Their extremely attenuated proportions, however, and the delicate scale of the round-arched brackets and finials that link them, are Federal, not Greek. Wide entablatures, flush-board siding, and a central door with elaborately molded enframement detail the two-story portion of the main facade. The naive mixture of Federal elements with a basically Greek Revival format makes the Day house typical of many untutored hybrids that marked the American frontier. John W. Day (1810–1881), a farmer who moved from Macomb County in 1836, built this dwelling on 160 acres in Dryden Township for his family.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
×

Data

Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "John W. and Polly Parkhurst Day House", [Dryden, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-LP2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 362-362.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,