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Menominee County Courthouse

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1874–1875, Gurdon P. Randall; late 1970s–early 1980s restoration, William Kessler and Associates. 839 10th Ave.

This cupola-topped symmetrical red brick cube with a central pedimented pavilion projecting slightly from each facade, a bracketed wooden cornice, stone stringcourse, and stone quoins gives Menominee County an appropriate image for its seat of government. Plans for the courthouse were prepared by Randall of Chicago, a specialist in courthouse designs who once worked in Asher Benjamin's office. The courthouse is arranged with the jail on the first floor, offices on the second, and the courtroom on the third. Cummings and Hagan were the construction contractors. The county attached a jail to the south of the courthouse in 1902, and an addition to the rear in the 1930s. One hundred years after it was completed, the courthouse was restored under the direction of Kessler.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Menominee County Courthouse", [Menominee, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-ME1.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 539-539.

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