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Lander County Offices (Lander County Courthouse)

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Lander County Courthouse
1871, Dan P. Bell. South side of Main St. (U.S. 50)

This structure is a late manifestation of the Greek Revival style. Such time lags were typical of nineteenth-century Nevada. Dan P. Bell, a mining engineer, designed the two-story brick courthouse, which features a stone foundation, five-bay facade, and double-door entry with transom. Windows and doors are arranged symmetrically on both stories. The gable roof rises above a brick denticulated cornice, and a small oculus decorates the pediment.

Over time, the mines around Austin failed. In the mid-twentieth century U.S. 50 helped the economy to a certain extent by bringing travelers through central Nevada, but with the opening of I-80 to the north, fewer people passed through this old mining town. In 1979 the county government moved to Battle Mountain but retained the old courthouse for use as county offices.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
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Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Lander County Offices (Lander County Courthouse)", [Austin, Nevada], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/NV-01-CE13.

Print Source

Buildings of Nevada, Julie Nicoletta. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, 172-172.

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