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Old Central Pacific Freight Depot

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c. 1880, c. 1905. Railroad St. opposite the end of Melarkey St.
  • Old Central Pacific Freight Depot

The oldest extant structure associated with the Central Pacific Railroad in Winnemucca, this freight depot, now owned by Union Pacific, still retains the ochre paint characteristic of Central Pacific and Southern Pacific buildings. The long, narrow depot stands on a lot between Railroad Street and the tracks. This site was originally occupied by a wide loading platform with one small, gable-roofed freight shed at each end. Around 1905 Southern Pacific filled the space between them with a large, gableroofed shed, forming one long, continuous building. Wide eaves supported by diagonal brackets extend unevenly over the loading docks on both sides of the building. The Railroad Street side has a 20-foot-wide dock, requiring longer eaves. Economical board-and-batten siding, used frequently on railroad warehouses, clads the walls.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
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Data

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Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Old Central Pacific Freight Depot", [Winnemucca, Nevada], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/NV-01-NO18.

Print Source

Buildings of Nevada, Julie Nicoletta. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, 138-138.

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