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The Castle

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1863–1868. West side of S. B St. between Taylor and Flowery sts.
  • The Castle
  • The Castle

Virginia City residents call this wood-frame Second Empire house the Castle. It stands high above B Street on a lot defined by stone retaining walls and a steep staircase leading from the street to the front porch. Mansions once lined this portion of B Street, giving it the name “Millionaires' Row.” Like many other opulent Virginia City mansions, the Castle has as its crowning glory a three-story tower with a mansard roof and dormers.

Robert Graves, superintendent of the Empire Mine, began building the Castle in 1863 and completed it in 1868. He was from a prominent London publishing family, and it is apparent from the refined character of his house that he wished to bring a sense of luxury and civilization to the Comstock. The interior retains much of the original furnishings and trim, including black walnut finishes and silver doorknobs. Now a private museum, the Castle is open to the public for tours.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
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Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "The Castle", [, Nevada], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/NV-01-NW052.

Print Source

Buildings of Nevada, Julie Nicoletta. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, 92-92.

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