You are here

E. F. Hays and Son Hardware Store

-A A +A
1892. 106 W. Slippery Rock St.

Entering Hays Hardware is like time traveling back to the 1890s: the owner prides himself on being able to sell a single nail rather than the prepackaged allotments sold in the big box stores. Edward F. Hays opened his business in 1882, but that store burned to the ground ten years later. He reopened in 1892 on the same site in the present building. The store's false front has a bracketed cornice with a semicircular “pediment” in the center, and is shaded by a deep overhang sheltering the two entrances. Between them is a windowed office, complete with its original safe. Toward the rear of the store is a working hand-powered, rope-operated elevator. The back room is still heated with a wood stove and is piled high with the tools accumulated from more than one hundred years in the hardware business.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "E. F. Hays and Son Hardware Store", [Chicora, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-BU17.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 180-180.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,