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Moses Thompson Homestead

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1838, with additions. 185 Duck Run Rd.

Duck Run Road hosts several interesting farms, and this complex best represents them. The farmhouse with Flemish bond brickwork built in 1838 features six-over-six windows, gable end chimneys, and a sidelight and transom that frame the main door. A picture window installed on the west elevation and the large front porch on the north side are later additions. The nearby two-story brick springhouse preceded the house and most likely functioned as living quarters for the family until the farmhouse was complete. Considerably smaller and lacking in the higher style details of the house, the springhouse retains its original six-over-six windows. The waterwheel on the north side is not original. The remaining buildings are typical of farms throughout the commonwealth. The farm itself was home to a commercial dairy operation, and the concrete masonry buildings on the property reflect that purpose.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Data

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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Moses Thompson Homestead", [Mill Hall, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-CN16.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 434-435.

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