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Heisey Museum (John Henderson–Seymour D. Ball House)

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John Henderson–Seymour D. Ball House
c. 1831, 1865. 362 E. Water St.

This five-bay two-story brick Gothic Revival house has been carefully maintained in its 1865 condition by the Clinton County Historical Society. It features the carved vergeboards, corbeled chimneys, steeply pitched gables, and arched gable-end windows typical of the style, as well as interior furnishings appropriate to the era. The house was remodeled several times, following its construction as the Henderson House in a Greek Revival fashion c. 1831. It became a tavern and withstood a variety of owners and several floods, until the flood of 1865 caused then owner and lawyer Seymour D. Ball to rebuild the house in its present form. The house was donated to the Clinton County Historical Society by Mrs. Samuel Heisey in 1962.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Heisey Museum (John Henderson–Seymour D. Ball House)", [Lock Haven, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-CN2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 430-430.

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