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Frank Schwab House

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c. 1905, attributed to George F. Barber. 18621 Cussewago Rd.

This house represents well the early-twentieth-century fashion for Colonial Revival. It is sited in isolated splendor overlooking the town of Meadville, and in winter is visible from Bicentennial Park on the east side of French Creek. The house's main feature is a two-story porch supported by Ionic columns and with a pseudo-Palladian window in the pediment. A similar house at 494 Chestnut Street is “A New Colonial Design” (see CM4) from the Modern Dwellings (1904) catalog of George F. Barber, an architect who specialized in mail-order plans. A frame version appears at 263 Randolph Street in Meadville. Two houses in Clarion have similar porches, with enough variation to make one suspect they were imitations done by a local contractor without plans.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Data

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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Frank Schwab House", [Meadville, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-CR17.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 515-515.

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