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Office Building (Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Rochester Railroad Passenger Station)

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Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Rochester Railroad Passenger Station
1903, Frederick, builder. W. Main St. and Montmorenci Ave.

This depot was built for the Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Rochester Railroad in 1903. Ten years earlier their stations, like the one at DuBois, Clearfield County, were designed by the Rochester architectural firm of Gordon, Bragdon and Orchard. It is not known which of two successor firms might have designed this station, or whether an entirely different firm did the work, since all that is known is the builder's last name. Nonetheless, the brick building has interesting details: a hipped roof with the expected wide overhanging eaves is split in the middle by an intersecting hipped-roof block. On the track side, the central portion is polygonal and its flanking walls are flat, while on the street side the central section is flat and the side walls have three-sided oriel windows. Deep brackets, contrasting stone quoins, and a sill course further enliven the design. Today, the building serves as offices.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Office Building (Buffalo, Pittsburgh and Rochester Railroad Passenger Station)", [Ridgway, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-EL7.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 441-441.

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