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Sturgeon House

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c. 1838, attributed to Samuel Sturgeon. 4302 Avonia Rd.

Two brothers of Irish descent, William and Jeremiah Sturgeon, came to Fairview from Dauphin County in 1797, after purchasing land in this area from the Pennsylvania Population Company. Fairview was originally called Sturgeonville, as the brothers had sired five sons by 1810. Jeremiah's son Samuel C. Sturgeon (1801–1878) became a carpenter and is credited with building this frame saltbox house for his younger brother Robert. The design of the house is unusual because the entrance, set off by fluted square columns, is recessed on the lower side, rather than centered on the taller side.

Fairview has seven remaining Sturgeon-related buildings, four houses and three barns scattered throughout the borough, although most have been considerably altered. It is also thought that Sturgeon designed the Believer's Chapel (c. 1842; 4100 block Avonia Road), a simple frame Greek Revival chapel. Although missing the top of its steeple, it has original siding, door and window surrounds, and a central doorway. The chapel has housed five different congregations as well as a factory over the years.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Sturgeon House", [Fairview, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-ER44.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 506-506.

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