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Philip G. Cochran United Methodist Church

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1926–1927, Thomas Pringle. Howell St. at Griscom St.

Scottish-born Thomas Pringle (1881–1951) came to Pittsburgh in 1903, attended the Carnegie Institute of Technology, and worked with several of the best local firms, including Alden and Harlow and Janssen and Abbott. Sarah Cochran (see FA22) commissioned Pringle in 1926 to build this Gothic Revival church to honor her deceased husband and son. The tower at the crossing of the nave and transept is marked with a smooth spire with small lancet dormers and a pent-skirted base. Exterior walls of variously sized sandstone are textured by adze marks, and the roof is covered in irregularly shaped slate shingles. Ralph Adams Cram's book American Church Building of Today (1929) features four illustrations of the church on pages 225–28. The parish building attached at the southwest has the half timbering and leaded glass windows characteristic of domestic Gothic architecture.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Philip G. Cochran United Methodist Church", [Dawson, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-FA21.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 250-250.

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