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Huntingdon Library and Huntingdon County Historical Society (McMurtrie Houses)

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McMurtrie Houses
1822; 1969 library; 1854 historical society; c. 1855 gallery; 1872 rear addition. 330 Penn, and 106 and 100 4th sts.

These three red brick buildings were in the McMurtrie family from 1822 to 1952. The library at 330 Penn Street is a Colonial Revival update of an 1822 house, with the addition of a bracketed cornice and a Palladian window in the gable. The one-story addition of 1969 provided additional space for the public library. Behind the library, William McMurtrie's residence of 1854 at 106 4th Street is Flemish bond brickwork on the exterior, with a substantial Tuscan-columned portico sheltering the main entrance. It is now occupied by the Huntingdon County Historical Society. At 100 4th Street, a one-and-one-half-story storefront building now houses an art gallery. A miniature house built in 1887 for Huntingdon's centennial parade is on display in the yard between the two. The grouping illustrates the variety of the town's house types and that historic preservation can provide useful commercial and institutional spaces.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Huntingdon Library and Huntingdon County Historical Society (McMurtrie Houses)", [Huntingdon, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-HU4.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 357-357.

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