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The Shoppes at Quail Acres (William M. Quail House)

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William M. Quail House
1837. 1445 Washington Rd. (U.S. 19), 4 miles northeast of Washington

Used today as offices and shops, the stately Quail house was built by a successful farmer and stock dealer with considerable wealth and architectural savvy. From the bridged chimneys to the two-story pedimented projecting porch and the symmetrical fanlit central entrances on the first and second stories, the details of the house have been influenced by James River plantation houses in Virginia and by Thomas Jefferson's first version of Monticello. The Quail house is large, with three interior stairways and a large ell on the south elevation. Several original outbuildings remain on the four-and-one-half-acre property: a brick springhouse and carriage house close to the southwest corner, a handsome frame barn with a storm shed and a stone foundation, and three c. 2005 wooden commercial buildings. All are rented to commercial enterprises. The Linn house (1848; 27 Brehm Road), of similar design and grandeur to the Quail house, but in poor condition, is located nearby.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
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Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "The Shoppes at Quail Acres (William M. Quail House)", [Canonsburg, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-WS11.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 282-282.

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