You are here

Caln Meetinghouse

-A A +A
1726, 1801. 901 Caln Meetinghouse Rd., 4 miles northeast of Coatesville

This is an early example of what might be considered a one-story Welsh meetinghouse type that contrasts with the two-story English meetinghouses of Bucks and Montgomery counties. It probably began as a single room of the Old Haverford type ( DE38). A folding wood partition was added at the time that the double meetinghouse became fashionable and was reincorporated when the building was doubled in 1801. Unlike other meetinghouses, when the Orthodox–Hicksite schism fragmented the Society of Friends in 1827, the two groups managed to accommodate each other here by dividing the building with the Hicksite group meeting in the west half and the Orthodox in the east half. The exterior is simply fashioned of roughly quarried local stone.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

George E. Thomas, "Caln Meetinghouse", [Downingtown, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-CH32.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 252-252.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,