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Office Building

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First National Bank
1905, Jacoby and Weishampel. 13 N. 7th St.

One of Allentown's first tall buildings, the steel-framed structure soars nine stories above Center Square. As in many turn-of-the-twentieth-century cities, architects displayed civic pride in exuberant Beaux-Arts styling. The building's two-story base carries giant engaged Ionic columns resting on sculpted lion heads. A stringcourse with egg and dart molding, a balustrade, and exaggerated dentils separate the base from seven floors above. The balustrade and molding details are repeated between floors eight and nine, and bay windows at each end of the facade rise from the fourth floor through the eighth. A heavy cornice on engaged Corinthian columns completes the composition.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Data

Timeline

  • 1905

    Built

What's Nearby

Citation

George E. Thomas, "Office Building", [Allentown, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-LH2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 291-291.

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