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Integrity Title and Trust Company

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1928, Paul P. Cret with Green and Lavella. S. 16th and Walnut sts.

Cret also designed the modest modern classical banking offices for the same bank at 715–719 Chestnut Street in 1923 and another banking house at Broad Street and Columbia Avenue (1929; c. 1980 demolished). Here, working with Green and Lavella of Massachusetts, he essayed a more Moderne mode with large-scale ornament overlaid by Aztec detail that contrasts with the immense lamps of the lower facade. A handsome touch is the carved limestone plaque by the brilliant sculptor R. Tait McKenzie denoting the former site of the house of Philadelphia's great late-nineteenth-century psychiatrist and novelist S. Weir Mitchell. The western and southern extension of the business district extended to 17th and Walnut streets where it blurs with the larger scale residential towers of Rittenhouse Square.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Integrity Title and Trust Company", [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-PH73.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 96-96.

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